Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 45-

Neuroblastoma cancer in children


Upendra Nagaich 
 Editor, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical, Technology and Research, Editor-in-Chief, SPER Times, Secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, 22-C, Jawahar Colony, Gwalior - 474 001, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Upendra Nagaich
Editor, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical, Technology and Research, Editor-in-Chief, SPER Times, Secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, 22-C, Jawahar Colony, Gwalior - 474 001, Madhya Pradesh
India




How to cite this article:
Nagaich U. Neuroblastoma cancer in children.J Adv Pharm Technol Res 2019;10:45-45


How to cite this URL:
Nagaich U. Neuroblastoma cancer in children. J Adv Pharm Technol Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2021 Nov 28 ];10:45-45
Available from: https://www.japtr.org/text.asp?2019/10/2/45/256016


Full Text

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Dear Friends,

Neuroblastoma is a kind of cancer which develops in specific kinds of nerve tissue. It is commonly beginning from adrenal glands but is capable of developing in the neck, abdomen, or spine. The symptom comprises a lump in the abdomen, neck, or chest and bone pain. The cause of neuroblastoma can be a mutation inherited from parents. The common symptoms are fatigue, loss of appetite, joint pain, and fever. Other symptoms relies on primary tumor locations, viz., swollen belly and constipation in the abdomen, breathing problems in the chest, inability to stand when present on the spinal cord, pain due to bone lesions in legs, and anemia when present in the bone marrow. The majority of neuroblastoma is located in the adrenal glands. Neuroblastoma tumors have been detected in patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a disorder of breathing control associated with Hirschsprung disease. CCHS occurs due to germline mutations which may pass directly from parent to child or may be a new genetic mutation in the kid, basically in paired-like homeobox 2B gene. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene mutation is mostly reported in patients with family history of neuroblastoma. Diagnosis is dependent on biopsy of tissue. Others include blood and urine test, neurological examination, multiple imaging studies, viz., computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scans. The therapy includes observation, radiation (external or internal), chemotherapy, or stem cell transplantation.

As this is a form of cancer, diagnosis and long-term survival may differ from individual to individual. Timely medical attention and hostile treatment are significant. Regular follow-up care is necessary for a kid diagnosed with neuroblastoma.