Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 14--18

Anticoagulation control among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A single tertiary cardiac center experience


Shaban Mohammed1, Amer H. S. Aljundi1, Mohamed Kasem1, Mohammed Alhashemi2, Ayman El-Menyar3 
1 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Heart Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
2 Department of Cardiology, Heart Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
3 Department of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornel Medical College; Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar

Correspondence Address:
Ayman El-Menyar
Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Hamad General Hospital, P. O. Box: 3050, Doha
Qatar

There is a limited knowledge about the predictors of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Furthermore, few reports addressed the role of time in therapeutic range (TTR) that could reflect the safety and efficacy of anticoagulation therapy. We aimed to assess factors that affect the quality of anticoagulation therapy utilizing TTR in patients with NVAF. A retrospective observational study was conducted for patients with NVAF who were maintained on warfarin >6 months at a tertiary cardiac care hospital. Patients were categorized according to the TTR status (≥65% vs. <65%). A total of 241 eligible patients were identified. A high-quality anticoagulation based on TTR values ≥65% was found in 157 (65.1%) patients; the remaining (34.9%) patients represented the low-quality anticoagulation group (TTR <65%). Demographics and clinical characteristics were comparable in the two TTR groups. Both groups were comparable in terms of warfarin dose and medications use. When compared to patients with high-quality anticoagulation, patients in the low-quality anticoagulation group were more likely to seek outpatient warfarin clinic visits more frequently (22.3 ± 5.5 vs. 18 ± 4.4, P = 0.001) and to have higher rate of polypharmacy (57.1% vs. 42%, P = 0.03). Of note, patients in both groups had similar major bleeding events (P = 0.41). After adjusting for age and sex, polypharmacy use was a predictor of poor coagulation control (odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-3.33; P = 0.03). In NVAF patients, TTR is generally high in our cohort. Patients with polypharmacy and frequent clinic visits have lower TTR. High-quality oral anticoagulation could be achieved through optimizing TTR without a significant risk of major bleeding.


How to cite this article:
Mohammed S, Aljundi AH, Kasem M, Alhashemi M, El-Menyar A. Anticoagulation control among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A single tertiary cardiac center experience.J Adv Pharm Technol Res 2017;8:14-18


How to cite this URL:
Mohammed S, Aljundi AH, Kasem M, Alhashemi M, El-Menyar A. Anticoagulation control among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A single tertiary cardiac center experience. J Adv Pharm Technol Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Mar 27 ];8:14-18
Available from: http://www.japtr.org/article.asp?issn=2231-4040;year=2017;volume=8;issue=1;spage=14;epage=18;aulast=Mohammed;type=0